19 Types of Aquarium Shrimp Ranked According to How Easy It Is to Rear Them

Aquarium shrimps have gained traction and become more popular over the last few years. They’re beautiful to look at, relatively easier to care for and require less maintenance as compared to other pets (though this also depends on their species!). 

With more than 2,000 species of shrimps known, they can be categorized into 2 groups – freshwater and saltwater. The main difference is the type of water that they thrive in. 

Take a look at these 19 types of aquarium shrimp to consider adding into your tank and learn about how to maintain an aquarium below!

Types of Freshwater Aquarium Shrimp

There are over 600 varieties of freshwater shrimp and they make great aquarium pets for various reasons:

  • They come in assorted colors and patterns which help brighten and liven the aquarium.
  • Most freshwater shrimps are scavengers in nature. This means that they help to clean up the aquarium by ingesting algae and biofilms.
  • Certain species are small enough to be kept in nano tanks, which are great for small apartments.
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Note!
If you’re planning to add these shrimp into an aquarium with fish, they should be kept away from predatory and aggressive ones or they may end up as food.

1. Cherry Shrimp

Also known asNeocaridina davidi
Place of originTaiwan
ColorsStandard, Sakura, Fire Red, Painted Fire Red, Blue Velvet, Green Jade, Yellow Sakura, Chocolate, Orange Sakura
Life expectancy1 – 2 years
Size1.5 inch
DietOmnivore
Suitable forBeginners

These dwarf shrimps are one of the most popular freshwater aquarium shrimps for beginners thanks to their hardy nature, affordable prices and bright colors. They come in varying shades of red. However, aquarists have also selectively bred Cherry Shrimps of other colors. 

Cherry Shrimps are omnivores that can feed on any plant matter or microorganisms that are available to them. 

They’re generally peaceful, reserved, and tend to avoid confrontations. They’re also comfortable in groups.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size25 liters
Recommended pH6.5 – 8.0
Temperature range23°C – 29°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes

2. Bloody Mary Shrimp

Bloody Mary Shrimp at the bottom of the aquarium
Also known asNeocaridina davidi
Place of originTaiwan
ColorsBright red
Life expectancy 1 – 2 years
Size1 to 1.5 inches
DietOmnivore
Suitable forBeginners

Selectively bred from Dwarf Chocolate Shrimps, they’re very similar to Cherry Shrimps (which belong to the same Neocaridina family as the Chocolate Shrimp). They’re equally easy to care for and are suitable for beginners. They’re also amicable in nature!

The Bloody Mary Shrimp has a deeper tone of red than all the dwarf shrimps. Also, they appear to have a transparent exoskeleton coupled with blood-red tissue. This is unlike the Cherry Shrimp, whose shells give them their red color.

As omnivorous scavengers, they help to clean up wastes in aquariums. They can feed on microorganisms, algae, and even decaying plant matter.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size25 liters
Recommended pH6.8 – 7.5
Temperature range17.5°C – 25.5°C
Can they be kept with other shrimps Yes

3. Rili Shrimp

Also known asNeocaridina davidi var. 'Rili'
Place of origin Taiwan
ColorsRed, orange, blue, blue jelly, carbon, blue-black
Life expectancy1 – 2 years
Size1 to 1.5 inches
DietOmnivore
Suitable forBeginners

Carefully bred from Cherry Shrimps, Rili Shrimps are known for their intense colors with transparent mid-body bands. They come in various stunning colors and you’ll be sure to find something for you!

These tropical shrimps are acclimated to stagnant water and can survive in a wider range of temperatures. Furthermore, they’re great inhabitants of nano tanks! 

While they can co-exist with various aquatic animals, do keep them away from predatory fishes and crabs. 

Rili Shrimps are great for beginner breeders, but caution should be taken when placing them with other Neocaridina shrimps as they may crossbreed. We don’t want a dull aquarium, do we?

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size20 liters
Recommended pH6.5 – 8.5
Temperature range14.0°C – 29.0°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes
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Note!
While mixing different Neocaridina varieties makes your aquarium seem vibrant, they may crossbreed. The hybridization of different varieties often leads to dull-colored offsprings (or offshrimps).

4. Amano Shrimp

Also known asCaridina multidentata, Japonica Amano, Japanese Swamp Shrimp, Yamato Shrimp
Place of origin Japan
ColorsVarying shades of translucent light gray, green, light brown, and reddish-brown
Life expectancy2 – 3 years
Size1.5 – 2.0 inches
DietOmnivore
Suitable forBeginners

Amano Shrimps are one of the larger species of dwarf shrimps and are quite a popular choice among owners. They’re best known for consuming any sort of algae and keeping the aquarium clean. In fact, they’re able to devour the notoriously pesky thread, beard, and hair algae!

Despite this, they still require supplements on top of the existing algae in the aquarium. As omnivores, it’s imperative to include some animal-based protein for them to stay healthy. 

While they’re generally cordial with other creatures, it’d be best to rear them in groups of at least 6. This would prevent them from exerting dominance over each other.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size40 liters
Recommended pH6.0 – 7.5
Temperature range15.0°C – 27.0°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes

5. Bamboo Shrimp

Also known asAtyopsis moluccensis, Fan Shrimp, Filter Shrimp, Asian Filter Shrimp, Wood Shrimp, Timber Shrimp, Singapore Shrimp, Marble Shrimp, Mountain Shrimp, Rock Shrimp, Maluku Shrimp, Flower Shrimp
Place of originSoutheast Asia
ColorsCream white, green, blue, red, brown
Life expectancy 1 – 2 years
Size2 – 4 inches
DietDetritivore but food must be in particulate forms
Suitable forBeginners

Nicknamed gentle giants, Bamboo Shrimps are non-aggressive despite their size. They have a stripe down their backs and are customarily thicker and more cumbersome than dwarf shrimps. 

They also have 4 pairs of fans that act like their hands. They grab and filter micro-particles in the water before feeding themselves with these fans.

Suited for beginner shrimp owners, they generally don’t care for much except for the water flow and velocity. As such, they’re unsuitable for nano tanks which are unable to supply a uniform water flow. 

Bamboo Shrimps can live harmoniously with other shrimps and small fishes. However, caution should still be taken especially during feeds, as small fishes may unintentionally bite on their fans if there are large-enough food particles.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size75 liters
Recommended pH7.0 – 7.5
Temperature range22.0°C – 28.0°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes

6. Ghost Shrimp

Also known asPalaemonetes paludosus, Glass Shrimp
Place of origin​​North America
ColorsTransparent with green or brown spots
Life expectancy 1 year
Size1.5 – 2 inches
DietOmnivore
Suitable forBeginners

Ghost Shrimps are known for their transparent and ghost-like bodies. This makes it hard for their predators to see them. Their transparent bodies also allow owners to see what they’ve eaten and how they pass through their digestive systems. 

The males can typically grow to a maximum of 1.5 inches while the females can grow up to 2 inches, making them perfect for nano tanks.

Ghost Shrimp are a tenacious species and can live in a wider range of temperatures. They’re also great tank cleaners and can feed on algae, larvae, and leftover food. Hence, they’re usually found in the middle or bottom of the tank.

They can survive alone or in small groups and can be kept with other species of shrimp such as the Cherry Shrimp. However, it’s important to avoid putting too many of them in the same tank as they can get aggressive if there isn’t enough space.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size20 liters
Recommended pH7.0 – 8.0
Temperature range18.0°C – 29.0°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes

7. Tiger Shrimp

Side profile of Tiger Shrimp
Also known asCaridina cantonensis
Place of origin​​Asia
ColorsBlack, brown blue, green, pink, red, tangerine
Life expectancy2 – 3 years
Size0.8 – 1.2 inches
DietOmnivore
Suitable forBeginners – Intermediate

Tiger Shrimps got their name for their resemblance to tigers. They’ve got stripes all over their bodies and come in different colors – from the common black ones to even blue and red! 

Suited for beginners, they’re generally easy to care for, just like Cherry Shrimps. However, they consume more food and can get quite aggressive when hungry (a hungry shrimp is an angry shrimp!). Hence, they should be kept away from Neocaridina species. 

Additionally, it’s advisable to keep them away from other Caridina shrimps as crossbreeding may occur and they may lose their colors.

Ghost Shrimp can be kept in small colonies to feel safe. Other tank mates that may be suitable for them include snails and various shrimps such as Red Nose Shrimp, Malwa Shrimp, and Amano Shrimp.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size20 liters
Recommended pH6.5 – 7.5
Temperature range24.0°C – 25.5°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsDepends

8. Vampire Shrimp

Side profile of translucent-grey Vampire Shrimp
Also known asAtya gabonensis, African Fan Shrimp, African Filter Shrimp, Gabon Shrimp, Viper Shrimp, Cameroon Shrimp, Rhino Shrimp
Place of originWestern Africa, South America
ColorsTypically white but they are able to change their colors to help them camouflage. Their color ranges from blueish gray to green to even pink and cream.
Life expectancy 3 – 5 years
Size2 – 4 inches
DietOmnivore but can only take food in particulate forms
Suitable forIntermediate

Vampire Shrimps are known for their ability to change colors due to various factors such as environmental conditions and diet. Physically, they’re bigger and thicker than their Bamboo Shrimp counterparts. 

They’re fan feeders, which means that they catch food particles from the water current with their little fan-like claws. Their diet includes plant matter, microorganisms, and even uneaten fish food. 

Vampire Shrimps are nocturnal and more active at night. Even then, they can be quite shy and tend to hide. 

Despite their menacing appearance, they’re actually quite docile and retreat from hostility. They also tend to be a little anxious and are easily startled. Hence, they’re not the most suitable for beginners. 

While they can live amicably with other invertebrates, they need to retreat to their own space, making them unsuitable for nano tanks.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size75 liters
Recommended pH6.5 – 7.5
Temperature range23.3°C – 28.8°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes

9. Whisker Shrimp

Close up of Whisker Shrimp with transparent body and blue details
Also known asMacrobrachium Lanchesteri, Indian Whisker Shrimp, Thailand Ghost Shrimp, Machrobrachium Ghost, Kuncho River Prawn
Place of originBiratnagar, Nepal
Colors​​Semi-transparent with black or brown stripes on the front
Life expectancy 1 – 2 years
Size1 – 2 inches
DietOmnivore
Suitable forIntermediate

Often mistaken for the Ghost Shrimp, Whisker Shrimps also have transparent bodies and their organs can be seen. However, they’re slightly bigger and have longer feelers. 

Moreover, their temperaments are complete opposites. Whisker Shrimp are known for their voracious appetites – they won’t spare any tiny tank mates that can fit into their mouths. In fact, their aggression becomes apparent when hungry. 

To avoid such situations, keep them away from small aquatic creatures like fishes and snails.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size40 liters
Recommended pH6.5 – 8.5
Temperature range24°C – 30°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsDepends

10. Crystal Shrimp

Also known asCaridina cf. cantonensis, Bee Shrimp, Crystal Red Shrimp, Crystal Black Shrimp
Place of originJapan
ColorsRed, black
Life expectancy 1.5 years
Size1 – 1.5 inches
DietOmnivore
Suitable forIntermediate to advanced

Crystal Shrimps are selectively bred from Bee Shrimps and cannot be found in the wild. 

These dwarf shrimps are highly-prized for their beautiful colors and can be slightly expensive depending on their grades (which are dependent on their colors). In general, the more opaque and white they are, the more costly they’ll be.

This type of shrimp requires more care and experience as they can be quite sensitive due to their inbred nature. They don’t react well to sudden changes in their environment. Dietary-wise, they only need to be fed once daily due to their small sizes. 

Similar to Neocaridina shrimps, they can be kept with other shrimps but not with predatory and aggressive fishes.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size45 liters
Recommended pH5.8 – 7.4
Temperature range22.0°C – 25.0°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes

11. Sulawesi Shrimp

Also known asCaridina dennerli, Cardinal Sulawesi Shrimp
Place of originSulawesi, Indonesia
ColorsVarying shades of red with white spots
Life expectancy 1 – 2 years
Size0.5 – 1 inch
DietOmnivore
Suitable forIntermediate to advanced

First discovered in 2007, Sulawesi Shrimps are one of the most underrated species despite their resplendent colors. This may be due to their availability and price as there aren’t many active breeders of this species. 

Additionally, they aren’t suitable for beginners as they can be challenging to care for. While these dwarf shrimps can be kept in nano tanks, this is often not advisable as they require very specific conditions to survive and there’s little to no room for errors. 

Their pliant nature allows them to live cordially with other species. However, most fishes are unable to live in such alkalic environments. Some tank mates that can be introduced are Neocaridina shrimps and Sulawesi snails.

 Tank requirements
Minimum tank size20 liters
Recommended pH7.8 – 8.2
Temperature range26.0°C – 30.0°C
Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes
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Note!
It’s more challenging to upkeep and regulate the water conditions in nano tanks as compared to bigger tanks. This is due to the following reasons:

  • Frequent maintenance
  • Frequent maintenance is necessary as these tanks are more susceptible to rapid changes in water quality. This is due to the disproportionate ratio of surface area to volume, resulting in a faster rate of evaporation that can alter the water quality.

  • Higher risk
  • Due to the limited volume of water in nano tanks, the concentration of toxins is often higher than that of larger tanks.

    As the inhabitants of the tank dispel waste, the aggregation of waste in a 10-liter tank tends to be higher compared to a 40-liter tank. Hence, water change and quality checks have to be done regularly.

    Types of Saltwater Aquarium Shrimp

    Saltwater shrimps, also known as marine shrimps, are much larger than freshwater shrimps. Their shapes, colors, and sizes add greater dynamics and help to spiff up your home.

    Additionally, they form symbiotic relationships with other creatures in the same tank. This means that they’re able to benefit from each other’s existence.

    12. Cleaner Shrimp

    Also known asLysmata amboinensis, Skunk Cleaner Shrimp, Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp, Pacific Cleaner Shrimp
    Place of originIndo-Pacific Ocean and Red Sea
    ColorsSimultaneously red, white and yellow
    Life expectancy 3 – 5 years
    Size2 – 3 inches
    DietOmnivore
    Suitable forBeginners

    Cleaner Shrimps are terrific additions to your existing aquariums, especially if there are fishes in them already. A large portion of their diet consists of dead tissues and parasites that they remove from fish.

    They usually set up a “cleaning station” to welcome their clients (fishes) to get “cleaned”. They usually perform a dance routine by rocking from side to side to signify that they’re open for business.

    This species is suitable for beginners as they’re generally easy to care for and are quite hardy.

    They’re usually found in pairs and can be kept with reefs, non-predatory fishes like clownfishes and wrasses, and Peppermint or Fire Shrimps. However, they should be kept away from Coral Banded Shrimps as they’re known for their aggressive tendencies.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size40 liters
    Recommended pH8.0 – 8.4
    Temperature range23.0°C – 28.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes, except Coral Banded Shrimps

    13. Coral Banded Shrimp

    Also known asStenopus hispidus, Boxer Shrimp, Barber Pole Shrimp, Clown Shrimp
    Place of originIndo-Pacific region, Red Sea and Western Atlantic Ocean
    ColorsWhite with red, blue, purple, gold, yellow bands
    Life expectancy 2 – 5 years
    Size2 – 4 inches
    DietOmnivore
    Suitable forBeginners

    Coral Banded Shrimps are known for their vibrant colors with white stripes and long white antennae. They first gained popularity for being great at keeping pesky Bristle worms at bay. 

    Nocturnal by nature, they prefer dark corners and are often hiding during the day. However, they’re able to change their habits to function during the day as well. 

    Their omnivorous diet allows them to eat just about anything. However, they do have a preference for meaty food. Also, their aggression heightens when they’re hungry, so do remember to feed them regularly or they’ll go after their tank mates. 

    While they aren’t big in size, Coral Banded Shrimps require a larger tank due to their territorial nature. They can get defensive even with their own species if they get too close. 

    Their unyielding disposition can cause them to fight until one dies. Hence, they’re not suitable to share a tank with other species of shrimp.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size90 liters
    Recommended pH8.0 – 8.4
    Temperature range22.0°C – 27.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsNo

    Note!
    Bristle worms are tiny segmented worms that can be found in aquariums. They look similar to millipedes with bristle-like features to protect them from predators. They often go unnoticed due to their size and nocturnal nature.

    These worms are detritivores and eat decaying materials, serving their part as a clean-up crew. However, there are some species of bristle worms such as the fire worm that are carnivorous and feed on small fishes, corals, or crustaceans.

    Such species are a menace to your tanks and should be removed.

    14. Fire Shrimp

    Also known asLysmata debelius, Red Fire Shrimp, Blood Shrimp, Cardinal Cleaner Shrimp, Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp, Taiwan Fire Red Shrimp
    Place of originIndo-Pacific
    ColorsVaries from bright red to deep scarlet, with white spots
    Life expectancy 1.5 – 2.5 years
    Size1.5 – 2 inches
    DietOmnivore
    Suitable forBeginners

    The vibrant colors of the Fire Shrimp make them pop and add colors to your aquarium. 

    This species is generally quiet and calm unless threatened. They can get aggressive, even with their own species, if the tank is too small. However, this problem can be avoided if they’re placed in large enough tanks.

    Fire Shrimps are omnivorous and feed on almost anything, though they tend to prefer meat. Like Cleaner Shrimps, they help get rid of dead skin and scales from fishes and consume them. Using their antennae, they signal nearby fishes to approach.

    It’s recommended to place them in separate tanks from corals as they have a tendency to nibble on them, eventually damaging them. However, they’re affable with other shrimps (except the Coral Banded Shrimp) and small fishes.

    If you’re planning to house fish with these shrimp, they should be even-tempered and non-aggressive or the Fire Shrimp may be intimidated.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size45 liters
    Recommended pH6.8 – 7.5
    Temperature range21.0°C – 27.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes, except Coral Banded Shrimps

    15. Peppermint Shrimp

    Also known asLysmata wurdemanni, Sweeper Shrimp, Veined Shrimp, Caribbean Shrimp
    Place of originTropical Western Atlantic, Caribbean
    ColorsBright orange
    Life expectancy 1 – 2 years
    Size1.5 – 2 inches
    DietOmnivore
    Suitable forBeginners

    These bright orange, semi-transparent shrimps are highly adaptable to various water conditions and are great for beginners. 

    In addition, they help to clean your aquarium and rid it of pests so you won’t need aquarium pesticides. Besides devouring pests, they also feed on leftovers, dead tissues from fishes, and even dead skin particles from your hands!

    While they’re easy to maintain, it’s important to keep them happy and healthy. When stressed, these shrimp can lose their colors and may even turn completely transparent. 

    It’s recommended against housing Peppermint Shrimp in the same aquarium as corals and reefs as they may gnaw on them and destroy them over time. Do also keep in mind not to overcrowd the tanks with these shrimp as they can get territorial when their space is compromised.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size40 liters
    Recommended pH8.1 – 8.4
    Temperature range25.0°C – 28.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes, except Coral Banded Shrimps

    16. Sexy Shrimp

    Also known asThor amboinensis, Anemone Shrimp, Dancing Shrimp, High-tailed Shrimp, Pikmin Shrimp, Squat Shrimp
    Place of originIndo-Pacific
    ColorsOrange with white spots and blue outlines
    Life expectancy Up to 3 years
    Size1 – 1.5 inches
    DietOmnivore
    Suitable forBeginners

    Sexy Shrimps are great for those who are looking to start a saltwater pico or nano tank due to their small size. These shrimp are peaceful, fun to watch, and easy to care for.

    They tend to hang out in groups and are generally less stressed and more confident when together. They have a one-of-a-kind dance where they repeatedly raise and lower their bellies. 

    Dietary-wise, Sexy Shrimps enjoy eating tiny organisms and slime off anemones. These anemones also shield these shrimps from predators, showcasing their symbiotic relationship.

    Sexy Shrimps are harmless and can be kept with coral reefs and other shrimps with the exception of Coral Banded Shrimps due to their aggressive nature. However, they should be kept away from bigger territorial fish and clownfish.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size20 liters
    Recommended pH8.1 – 8.4
    Temperature range22.0°C – 28.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes, except Coral Banded Shrimps

    17. Mantis Shrimp

    Also known asStomatopod, Peacock Mantis Shrimp, Thumb Splitter, Prawn Killer, Sea Locust
    Place of originIndian and Pacific Oceans
    ColorsVaries from vivid and bright colors to dull colors like brown
    Life expectancy 3 – 6 years
    Size2 – 15 inches
    DietCarnivore
    Suitable forBeginners

    Despite their name, Mantis Shrimps aren’t actually shrimp – they’re stomatopods. However, they’re an equally popular choice of aquarium pets. Notorious for their predatory nature, these shrimps are also known for their quick reflexes and strong strike velocity.

    While there are more than 500 varieties of Mantis Shrimps, they can primarily be categorized into 2 groups – “smashers” and “spearers”. The difference between these two groups is the way they attack their prey.

    Smashers possess a club-like claw that’s powerful enough to bludgeon and smash the calcified shells of crabs and snails. Meanwhile, spearers are endowed with spiny claws that can be wielded to stab soft-bodied prey like worms and fishes.

    As such, Mantis Shrimps shouldn’t be kept with other aquatic creatures unless they’re meant to be feed for them.

    In spite of its aggressive nature, this species is actually quite easy to care for and great for beginners.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size40 liters
    Recommended pH8.0 – 8.5
    Temperature range22.0°C – 26.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsNo

    Note!
    Despite their small sizes, Mantis Shrimps are capable of breaking your bones or cutting your skin. Thus, you’re recommended to use a pair of tongs or forceps when handling this creature.

    18. Pistol Shrimp

    Close up of a transparent Pistol Shrimp
    Also known asSnapping Shrimp
    Place of originIndo-West Pacific
    ColorsWhite, green, red, brown
    Life expectancy Up to 4 years
    Size1.2 – 2.0 inches
    DietOmnivore with carnivorous inclination
    Suitable forBeginners

    Pistol Shrimps are known for their ability to create loud sounds using their snapping claws. They have two asymmetrical claws – a normal claw and a snapping claw. 

    The snapping claw is noticeably larger. When snapped, it also creates an immeasurable force that’s capable of taking out small fishes and invertebrates and warding off predators.

    While these shrimps are easy to care for and suitable for beginners, it’s important to note that they’re socially monogamous and can be territorial.

    Hence, they shouldn’t be kept in overcrowded tanks or they may get aggressive. If space permits, they can live peacefully with various species of shrimps like Cleaner Shrimps, reefs, corals, and non-aggressive fish.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size120 liters
    Recommended pH8.1 – 8.4
    Temperature range24.0°C – 28.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsYes, except Coral Banded Shrimps

    19. Harlequin Shrimp

    Also known asHymenocera picta
    Place of originHawaii, Indo-Pacific region
    ColorsWhite bodies with maroon/purple spots and blue outlines, white or cream bodies with bright pink/magenta spots
    Life expectancy Up to 7 years
    Size1 – 2 inches
    DietCarnivore
    Suitable forIntermediate – advanced

    The magnificent appearance of these shrimps appeals to many aquarium owners. However, they aren’t suitable for beginners due to various reasons.

    Harlequin Shrimps (or should they be called Harle-queen Shrimps) are extremely picky eaters that only feed on starfishes. Furthermore, they have enormous appetites and the cost of getting the starfishes can amount to a fair bit.

    As they don’t consume the entire starfish, regular cleaning is required. Otherwise, the starfish will be left to rot and cause pollution.

    While they can be kept with reefs, smaller fishes, and various crabs, they should be separated from other shrimps and starfishes. Shrimps are typically territorial and can get aggressive towards one another if there is insufficient space.

    In addition, they prefer to be alone or with a partner for mating purposes.

     Tank requirements
    Minimum tank size40 liters
    Recommended pH8.0 – 8.4
    Temperature range25.0°C – 29.0°C
    Can they be kept with other shrimpsNo, unless the tank is big enough

    Maintaining an Aquarium

    Clean aquarium with aquatic plants

    It’s crucial to maintain aquariums according to your pets’ needs so they can thrive. These environments should also closely mimic their natural habitats for them to feel safe.

     Water conditions

    One of the most important steps of maintaining an aquarium is to change the water regularly. By doing so, it: 

    • Prevents the water from turning cloudy and toxic 
    • Helps dilute the concentration of excess nutrients which might be harmful to the inhabitants

    However, the water shouldn’t be changed all at once. It’s recommended to remove and replace about 20% of the volume to avoid completely resetting the water conditions. 

    Sudden changes in the water parameters can stress your shrimp. For example, unsuitable pH levels can cause problems like algae and coral growth, affecting their health.

     Decorating the aquarium

    It is also imperative to read up on your pets’ natural habitats and what’s required to help them assimilate into their new homes. For instance, shrimps require hiding spots and some may feed on biofilm growth. In such cases, it would be good to introduce aquatic plants. 

    These plants will have to be cared for as well by providing them with supplements. This ensures that they are able to provide optimal nutrients and help stabilize nitrate levels.

    In addition, various natural ornaments or accessories can be included to provide more hiding spots for them.


    Note!
    Shrimps react badly to metals. Copper, in particular, is extremely toxic for them. Hence, it’s important to ensure that there are no traces of copper and that the water doesn’t come from a copper pipe.

    Freshwater Aquarium

    Freshwater aquariums are generally easier to maintain and are best suited for beginners. They require less equipment and freshwater fishes and shrimps are generally cheaper and easily available. There are various aqua pets to include in nano tanks as well. 

    While owners don’t have to monitor salinity, it’s important to regularly check and ensure that the water conditions such as the pH and temperature are suited for their pets.

    The water should also be clean and aerated so as to prevent the accumulation of germs.

    Saltwater Aquarium

    Saltwater aquariums are more difficult and expensive to maintain as compared to freshwater aquariums. They require more equipment such as powerheads and protein skimmers. Live rocks are also required to act as biological filtration systems.

    These aquariums have to be checked multiple times a day to ensure that water conditions remain consistent. Furthermore, the salinity has to be monitored closely and adjusted accordingly. 

    FAQs About Aquarium Shrimps

    While the terms are often used interchangeably, shrimps and prawns are, in fact, vastly different. One of the most distinct methods to tell them apart is to look at their anatomy. 

    • Pincers: Prawns have them on 3 of their 5 pairs of legs while shrimps only have them on 2 of their 5 pairs of legs.
    • Gills: Prawns have plate-like gills while shrimps have branching gills.
    • Body shape: They both have 3 body parts, namely the head, thorax, and abdomen, which overlap one another. However, the overlaps between these segments are bigger in shrimps.

    The lifespan of shrimps is highly dependent on their species and how well they’re taken care of. When well taken care of, some shrimps can outlive their life expectancy by a few years.

    It depends on the temperament of the shrimp and fish. However, the general rule of thumb is to keep predatory creatures away.

    The frequency of cleaning your aquarium is highly dependent on various factors such as: 

    • Size of the tank
    • Number of pets in the tank
    • Type of pets in the tank
    • Type of aquarium water (freshwater vs saltwater)

    A general rule of thumb would be to partially change the water (approximately 20% of the volume) every week and thoroughly clean the aquarium every month.

    A filter is usually installed for the following reasons: 

    • Remove debris from water 
    • Remove toxic buildup of ammonia and nitrates
    • Aerate water and provide oxygen

    However, they don’t clean the tanks. Hence, it’s essential to hand-clean tanks to remove chemical build-ups and prevent the water from having a cloudy appearance.

    As most freshwater shrimps feed on biofilm, it’s highly recommended to keep aquatic plants in the same tank. Aside from providing food, these plants also provide shelter and keep ammonia and nitrate levels low.

    Below are some floating plants to consider as they have a fast growth rate: 

    • Duckweed 
    • Moss balls
    • Water lettuce
    • Rotalas
    • Cyprus
    Vivian Quek
    Article by:
    Vivian Quek
    Contributors:
    Emilia Wong
    Travelling and eating are my biggest joys in life. When not doing the above, you'll probably find me binging on the latest k-drama or chasing the latest musicals in town!
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